Tagresources

Presentation: “What the f**k is social media?”

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Always a big fan of neat visualizations, particularly of complex topics, I found I really liked this 101 on social media by Marta Z. Kagan. Titled “What the f**k is social media“, Marta gives a quick, easy-to-understand rundown of the basic terminology paired with well-presented thoughts on why social media matter:

You can find more in Marta’s blog.

(via CyberSoc)

Global map of Open Educational Resources

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Heather Fond (blog), director of iCommons, created this map of Open Educational Resources (OER) and the most notable activists and organizations in the field. This is pretty awesome – check it out:


View Larger Map

I just added Creative Commons International – who else is missing? If you know any organization or activist, please add them to the map.

(via UNESCO chair in E-learning)

Yahoo releases Reputation Design Patterns (Yay!)

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Yahoo’s Design Pattern Library is a pretty awesome collection of design patterns – proven solutions for common or well-known problems. The idea is to provide answers to questions people (here: developers) encounter over and over again. Why reinvent the wheel?

Now there’s a whole set of design patterns for a reputation system, as well as some solid basics on online reputation and how it works. (You can find some thoughts about online reputation browsing this blog’s Identity 2.0 category.)

Yahoo Design Patterns for a Reputation System (Image: Screenshot of the collection Yahoo! Reputation Solution Patterns)

Reputation systems are important for online communities of all sizes: In a really small community, reputation might be implicit, but as the community grows, reputation needs to be managed in some way or another. Says the Online Journalism Blog:

In my experience, reputation systems are pretty important in encouraging users to keep coming back to your online community – you could argue, for instance, that the number of friends in Facebook or followers in Twitter is one simple example. Plurk more explicitly uses ‘karma’, as does (in a much better way) Slashdot

Yahoo says, this set of reputation-related design patterns is just one of “several collections of social-design related patterns that we’re working on. (…) They don’t tell you how to lay out a page or where to put an interactive widget. Instead, they address how to design a reputation system for your social software.”

This is excellent news: With something as tricky (and important) as your online reputation, you want some professional advice!

(via Online Journalism Blog, thanks Puja!)

Study: Real vs Fantasized Identity on Social Networking Sites

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FaberNovel Consulting has just published a study on best practices from social networking sites.

The whole study contains a great overview over what’s important if you analyze social networking sites. Two aspects stood out for me, though:

First, the authors pointed out four dimensions to help distinguish social networks:

FaberNovel: 4 Dimensions of Social Networks

Second, the study also covers the way, identity is constructed in social networks, and how different networks foster cater to different needs in this area. For instance, MySpace rather aims at exposing yourself and your fantasized identity, while Facebook serves more to expand your social network around your real identity:

FaberNovel: Real vs Fantasized Identity in Social Networks

It’s a great take and I highly recommend you scan this study. The whole presentation is also available in slide show format:

(via Read/WriteWeb)

How to build your own mesh network?

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As you may know, I’ve been obsessing about the One Laptop Per Child Project (OLPC) for awhile, for both its aims and potential. Here’s another project that ties right in, a simple guide on how to build your own mesh network. (The OLPC laptops support meshing out of the box, but if there’s no network to connect to…)

Wireless Africa has a guide for building your own DIY Mesh Guide. It’s particularly aimed at rural areas, and it features real step-by-step explanations (including a planning sheet) which should be useful even for non-tech folks.

DIY Mesh Network (image courtesy of http://wirelessafrica.meraka.org.za via Creative Commons) Image courtesy of Wireless Africa

Download the DIY Mesh Guide (PDF, 3.2MB). It’s released under Creative Commons (CC-BY-SA).

(via)